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6 Tips for Posting Content Anonymously 1

For one reason or another, you may find yourself wanting to publish things online anonymously. Now to some, the “A-word” conjures up images of hackers, Guy Fawkes masks, and people generally saying terrible things to each other on Twitter. There’s long been an ongoing debate about whether anonymity is something that should even be allowed on the Internet.

Yes. Yes it should. There’s no doubt that there are terrible people in the world; but anonymity is a powerful tool for good as well. Here are some of the more obvious examples:

  • Fighting the power: It sure would be nice if we lived in a world where everyone in every government had the people’s best interests at heart. We don’t, and they don’t. Ask Nelson Mandela, or any number of other great men and women throughout history who have fought for progress and human rights.
  • Exposing criminal activity: Whether you’re a crime blogger writing about the criminal underworld, or a whistleblower from some large corporation, exposing criminal activity is dangerous. People have died.
  • Adult content, and other “culturally offensive” themes: Something as simple as writing your own (very personal) memoirs can draw a lot of unwanted attention from those around you. Even if what you’re doing isn’t morally or ethically wrong by any reasonable standard, people aren’t always terribly understanding. And then, perhaps the people in your life would rather that their personal activities didn’t become public knowledge. Staying anonymous is a good way to avoid unnecessary drama, in cases like these.
  • Maybe it’s just work: One of my favorite blogs back in the day was Waiter Rant where a then-anonymous waiter told all of his juiciest stories. He stayed anonymous for the simple reason that his bosses didn’t want any extra drama at their restaurant. Besides, rude customers who might’ve just been having a really bad day don’t deserve the kind of hate the Internet can put out.
  • Not holding back: Webdesigner Depot runs a series of posts written anonymously called The Secret Designer. They’re anonymous, because they expose the underside of the web design industry that the writers don’t want to be associated with.

Sorgente: 6 Tips for Posting Content Anonymously

Dario

Dario

Dario De Leonardis esiste nell’Internet dalla fine degli anni ‘90. È stato, in ordine sparso: hacker, grafico, web developer, brand designer, analista politico, edonista, spin doctor b-side dell’hinterland tarantino, UI designer, installatore software, attivista per i diritti di tutti quelli che non vogliono togliere diritti agli altri, tecnico informatico, ghost writer, organizzatore eventi, autore satirico, cattivo da fumetto, social media strategist/manager, communication expert e modello. Da curriculum accademico sarebbe critico letterario e teatrale ma si vergogna a dirlo. Ama il cinema d’azione indocinese e il progressive rock del nord-est europa. Tendenzialmente affronta i suoi problemi con il binge watching e il sarcasmo. Sa come si scrive una È maiuscola con l'accento e non con l'apostrofo usando le combinazioni ASCII. È fortemente convinto che una cosa si possa pubblicizzare e vendere anche se non esiste realmente e che un giorno le botnet sui social svilupperanno una coscienza propria e conquisteranno il mondo.

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